Austenite

Austenite

Auto-curated
Playing 1/13
  • Unique properties of NiTi alloys

    YouTube 03:47
  • Why is the carbon solubility so different in ferrite vs austenite?

    YouTube 03:46
  • What is AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL? What does AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL mean?

    YouTube 03:03
  • Austenite stabilizer in Steel

    YouTube 02:40
  • 300 Series Stainless Steel - What is Austenitic Stainless Steel?

    YouTube 03:55
  • Silicon - The Internet's Favorite Element: Crash Course Chemistry #35

    YouTube 09:27
  • Tungsten - Periodic Table of Videos

    YouTube 02:18
  • Stainless Steel

    YouTube 02:35
  • SUICIDE SILENCE - You Only Live Once (OFFICIAL VIDEO)

    YouTube 03:19
  • Nickel - Periodic Table of Videos

    YouTube 13:45
  • Molybdenum - A Metal That Forms Weird Solutions!

    YouTube 06:16
  • How to Clean a Cast-Iron Skillet with Brad | Bon Appétit

    YouTube 02:45
  • Chromium - Periodic Table of Videos

    YouTube 13:23

Austenite, also known as gamma-phase iron (γ-Fe), is a metallic, non-magnetic allotrope of iron or a solid solution of iron, with an alloying element. In plain-carbon steel, austenite exists above the critical eutectoid temperature of 1000 K (727°C); other alloys of steel have different eutectoid temperatures. The austenite allotrope exists at room temperature in stainless steel. It is named after Sir William Chandler Roberts-Austen (1843–1902).

Discover in context

This site is not available in the landscape mode.
Please rotate your phone or install our app.